Writing exercise

You will not be graded on this.

Reorganize the facts here and write an inverted pyramid or pyramid lede. Make sure you have a nut graf. That’s the paragraph that tells us what the story is about and where it is going.

Make sure you write in the active voice and feel free to change sentences.

The story starts here:

Since May more than 11,000 immigrants have entered New York City’s shelter system.

Mayor Adams said the shelter system is near the breaking point.

José Aponte got off the a bus at the Port Authority and look around dazed.

At least nine busloads arrived from the Texas border to the Port Authority by mid-afternoon on Sunday, one bus more than last week’s previous apparent record of eight in a single day.

Typically, between 40 and 50 migrants are on each bus before they are dropped off and assisted by the city and non-profits.

Sunday’s record bus number comes as Texas officials angry over President Biden’s border policies have been ramping up the amount of migrants they’ve been transporting to “progressive” cities such as New York.

On Friday, an aid worker at the Port Authority said, “Before, it used to be one or two [buses] a day, three days a week.

Mayor Adams said, “It’s outrageous that he governor of Texas is sending people to New York, but we will find places for them to stay.”

Some immigrants have relatives in other cities and immigrant advocacy groups are working to help them connect. Carlos Sosa said, “We are trying to find people who can help those arriving including relatives in other cities.

José Aponte said in Spanish, “I left everything in Venezuela to make a new life here for me and my family. I hope that I can stay. I am willing to work at any job. I just need a chance.”

Immigrant advocates say that the Adams administration is not doing enough to help.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams said Sunday that Republican governors Greg Abbott of Texas and Ron DeSantis of Florida have created a “humanitarian crisis” by sending migrants from the U.S.–Mexico border up north.

Abbott began busing migrants from Texas to New York City and Washington, D.C., in the spring. DeSantis sent 50 migrants from Texas to Martha’s Vineyard last week.


Adams called on the governors to coordinate with the federal government and the blue states where they are sending migrants.

Abbott began busing migrants from Texas to New York City and Washington, D.C., in the spring. DeSantis sent 50 migrants from Texas to Martha’s Vineyard last week.

Adams argued that it is an easier transition for migrants when they have sponsors.

“We have Venezuelan communities in America, let’s coordinate in that fashion like we’ve done with other large communities we have in New York City where we’re able to coordinate, get sponsors, work with our non-government organizations,” Mayor Adams said. “That is what crisis calls for — it calls for coordination.”

Write these paragraphs in the active voice. You can change the sentences completely, but make sure that you convey the intended story or idea.

From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle:

Emergency repairs on a crumbling section of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway will mean closing most of the busy highway between Atlantic Avenue and Sands Street during three weekends and an unspecified number of nights between March and October of 2023.

From Complex News:

By now, you’ve likely heard the NBA pregame tunnel be compared to a fashion runway. Sure, it’s become a bit of a cliché when it comes to discussing the relationship between basketball and fashion and it’s probably hard to find many similarities between the Oratoire du Louvre and the inner workings of Capital One Arena, but the point is hard to argue when you see some of the eye-catching looks being shown off across an 82-game season. And one of the NBA pregame tunnel’s most talked-about models is Washington Wizards forward Kyle Kuzma. 

From Jezebel:

As Britain continues to mourn their late monarch Queen Elizabeth II—and grapple with her, er, complicated legacy—two women have reportedly been sexually assaulted while standing in a now 24-hours-long line to pay their respects, according to the Mirror UK.

After declaring an official, last-minute bank holiday for Queen Elizabeth’s funeral, UK citizens were invited to view Lizzie’s coffin at Westminster Hall, on display until the funeral procession begins. But as thousands of mourners waited in the queue at Victoria Tower Gardens on Wednesday night, 19-year-old Adio Adeshine allegedly took the opportunity to expose himself and press his genitals against at least two women from behind.

From Bleacher Report:

The Golden State Warriors don’t want to envision a scenario in which Draymond Green suits up for another team.

Green can opt out of the final year of his deal and hit free agency in 2023. Speaking with The Athletic’s Tim Kawakami, Warriors general manager Bob Myers said the four-time All-Star is “not a guy we look at and say he’s not going to be around.”

From the New York Daily News:

At least three people were killed Saturday when two small planes collided mid-air over Boulder County, Colo.

A single-engine Cessna 172 and a Sonex Xenos crashed into each other in flight near Vance Brand Airport in Longmon just before 9 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Writing an Op-Ed Opinion Piece

from the Washington Post

What is an op-ed?

An op-ed is an opinion piece by a guest writer that makes a clear argument about a topic usually (but not always) in the news. The name is derived from the traditional placement of these pieces opposite the editorial page of the printed newspaper.

Op-eds should be focused: 750 to 800 words is ideal. Op-eds can incorporate charts, photos, audio or even comics.

What is not an op-ed?

Return to menu

Personal essays that do not make an argument are generally not op-eds. Even if the op-ed includes a personal story, it should have a point to make — something readers can engage with and think about.

Journalistic investigations without an argument are not op-eds. Poems and works of fiction usually are not op-eds either. Neither are reviews of books, movies, television shows or other media. We only rarely accept op-eds that are written as open letters.

  • Help people more deeply understand a topic in the news.
  • Help them understand what it means for them.
  • Equip them with arguments they can employ when talking about the subject.
  • Elevate ideas that help them think about the world differently.
  • Expose them to topics they might not have heard about.
  • Help them better articulate their own perspective.
  • Help them understand perspectives different from their own.

Timing is to an op-ed as location is to real estate, especially if you are writing on a breaking-news topic. That means an op-ed submitted on the day after an event will have an advantage over one submitted a week later, when the conversation has slowed.

Not every op-ed will be about the news of the day, but it should always have an original angle — something readers might not have thought of before and will find interesting.

Your op-ed can be about any topic in the news and does not need to reference a specific Washington Post article.

Should I include supporting documentation for fact-checking?

Return to menu

Yes, this can be included in the comments field of this form, or after a piece is accepted. Supporting documents and citations are very helpful during the editing process.

How should I structure my op-ed?

The format of your op-ed helps the reader understand your argument. Here is a classic structure that does this effectively:

  • Statement of thesis or problem
  • Three reasons this argument is right or wrong
  • Conclusion

There are many other ways of presenting ideas that work, but any successful op-ed needs structure and a logical flow that makes the reader’s life easier, not harder.

What is a lede (also known as a lead)?

A lede (rhymes with “deed”) is the opening sentence or sentences of your op-ed, and it is very important.

A good lede will draw in readers and persuade them to keep reading. It can be your thesis, but it does not have to be. In any event, make sure to get to the crux of your argument fast — that means in the first couple of paragraphs. Remember, you have only 750 words, so make each of them count.

What is a kicker?

A kicker is the last sentence of your article. It should leave readers satisfied that they knew what the piece was about and that it was worth getting through. Sometimes circling back to the beginning does the trick.

Tips on Writing in the AP Style

The Associated Press (AP) Stylebook is widely accepted as a standard guide for writing and is frequently used as a reference on how to deal with numbers, names and titles, abbreviations, punctuation, time, capitalization, and many other important issues.

While it’s best to read the stylebook to learn all of the rules, there are some common ones you can learn without the book.

  • Spell out numbers between one and nine, and use Arabic numbers for 10 and higher. If you are referring to an age or percentage, use an Arabic number even if it is less than 10. When you start a sentence with a number, it should be spelled out even if it is 10 or higher.
  • When you refer to the United States as a noun, the two words should be spelled out. If you are using it as an adjective, it should be abbreviated as U.S.
  • Dates should always be expressed in Arabic numbers and should not end with a suffix such as “rd” or “th.” Months should always be capitalized, and certain months (Jan., Feb., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov. and Dec.) should be abbreviated when they are used with a specific date. Spell out when using alone, or with a year alone.
  • Arabic numbers (1, 2, 3… ) should be used for time, with the exception of midnight and noon. Insert a colon to separate hours and minutes, and use

a.m. or p.m. to indicate whether the time is during the day or night.

  • Academic degrees should not be abbreviated, and an apostrophe should be used to indicate a bachelor’s or master’s degree, but there is no possessive in Bachelor of Arts or Master of Science. Abbreviations are only acceptable when you are referring to a list of people with degrees.
  • Check for correct spelling and capitalization rules for some common technological terms: email, e-book, cellphone, smartphone, BlackBerry, download, Internet.
  • Also, it is important to ensure there are no statements in the text that might be considered libelous, that the meaning is clear, and there is no personal opinion, bias, or prejudice in the story. You should look for the following:
  • Check that you do not use adjectives to characterize persons and institutions as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ in hard news stories – this injects your biases or prejudices in your reporting.

Example: The eloquent mayor of Paris gave a speech Sunday. (biased)

The major of Paris gave a speech Sunday. (neutral)

  • Don’t make inferences, or statements about the unknown. Your judgment may be relevant in analytical writing, but not news reporting.

Example: The building caught fire early in the morning. It is likely that homeless residents set the fire. (unfair inference)

The building caught fire early in the morning. The cause is unknown, but under investigation. (fair)

  • Discriminate between the need for present and past verb tenses. Make your choice depending on emphasis and perspective: if what happened and its impact are more important, use present tense. If the emphasis is on time when or during what period an event occurred, use simple past.

Example: Last November’s election has changed the laws on marriage in California. (present)

The cease-fire was signed at 11:00 p.m. yesterday. (past)

  • Decide when to use active or passive voice. Consider whether you are emphasizing a subject or an object in your story. Active is typically the

preferred voice in news writing because it reveals the subjects that perform the actions. Passive voice shifts emphasis from subjects to objects, and thus can conceal the actor. This is especially common with crime stories, political and war reporting.

Example: The prime minister signed the treaty. (active)

The cars were stolen sometime last night. (passive)

Reporting Basics

 

Reporting 

Journalism means more than taking handouts or reporting what’s said in news releases. Good journalism rests on a set of principles. Solid stories require accurate information and balance in reporting it.

Think about answering a story’s basic questions:

  • who
  • what
  • when
  • where
  • why

 

HOW

Then examine how the story happened.

How do we connect the dots to tell a good story with a beginning, middle and end?

The inverted pyramid.

Traditionally journalists use the model of the inverted pyramid construct a story.Inverted Pyramid

 

But increasingly, news organizations encourage reporters to use better storytelling techniques, using characters and interesting details to get the reader, viewer or listener interested. Television stories often start with small details, or personal stories and we see that more and more in print, digital and radio.

pyramid
pyramid

Accuracy

Only report what you know was said, and by whom.  This means attributing statements to specific people:

  1. The mayor says…
  2. The district attorney says…
  3. The neighbor says…
  4. According to the Associated Press…
  5. According to The New York Times…
  6. According to the website….

 

Wikipedia

Wikipedia and many other websites aren’t always reliable sources.  If a site quotes another source, it’s important to go to the primary source to make sure that you have accurate information.

Just because somebody says something doesn’t mean it’s true.  Even high-ranking public officials may be misinformed, or may have an agenda that obscures the truth.  Even when you’re under deadline pressure, try to confirm everything that you’re told with additional sources.  It’s a good idea to have at least two sources.  Remember:  truth is an absolute defense against libel.

 

Elements of a Good Story

Ancient Greek writers developed a basic storytelling formula and they understood the importance of characters:

  • villains
  • victims
  • heroes

You’ll find victims, villains and heroes at the center of every good drama.  Audiences recognize the victim’s pain, hiss at the villain, and cheer for the hero. Most of what we cover will not be as dramatic as a classic Greek tale, and news coverage demands that we balance two sides of a story. Until the jury returns a guilty verdict, it’s unfair to characterize the accused as a villain. But if the actions of the accused are villainous, you report the facts and the audience, like the jury decides.

Highlight Characters

In daily news reporting, we don’t always have the luxury of a developing a story around a character. We do have to report the facts. But where we can, we want to highlight characters.

Often they reveal themselves in what they say, how they act, and through the expressions on their faces.

Readers, viewers and listeners want to engage with the real drama in real people’s lives. We feel their pain, their anger, their frustration and their triumph. We cheer them, get angry, or feel their pain. We’re indignant or inspired.

Characters drive stories and make them memorable.

Organization

Whether you begin with just the facts, an engaging character or an interesting detail, you   need to let your reader, viewer or listener in on the point of the story pretty quickly.

Journalism uses the nut graf , or paragraph, to explain the heart of the story. The nut graf should come pretty close to the top of the report. It helps to tie everything together.  It helps you keep the focus and continue to the ideas in your story.

Once you explain the point of the story, you can move on flesh it out with facts and details.

 

 

Language We Use

What do we call people in prison or jail?

https://www.themarshallproject.org/2021/04/12/what-words-we-use-and-avoid-when-covering-people-and-incarceration

http://feeds.wnyc.org/onthemedia

Said and Stated

https://www.writersdigest.com/write-better-fiction/keep-it-simple-keys-to-realistic-dialogue-part-ii

From the Associated Press Style Guide


Numbers

In general, spell out one through nine: The Yankees finished second. He had nine months to go. Use figures for 10 or above and whenever preceding a unit of measure or referring to ages of people, animals, events or things. Also in all tabular matter, and in statistical and sequential forms.

Use figures for:

ACADEMIC COURSE NUMBERS: History 6, Philosophy 209.

ADDRESSES210 Main St. Spell out numbered streets nine and under: 5 Sixth Ave.3012 50th St.No. 10 Downing St. Use the abbreviations Ave.Blvd. and St. only with a numbered address: 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Spell them out and capitalize without a number: Pennsylvania Avenue.See addresses.

AGESa 6-year-old girlan 8-year-old lawthe 7-year-old house. Use hyphens for ages expressed as adjectives before a noun or as substitutes for a noun. A 5-year-old boy, but the boy is 5 years oldThe boy, 5, has a sister, 10. The race is for 3-year-olds. The woman is in her 30s. 30-something, but Thirty-something to start a sentence.

CENTURIES: Use figures for numbers 10 or higher: 21st century. Spell out for numbers nine and lower: fifth century. (Note lowercase.) For proper names, follow the organization’s usage.


COURT DECISIONS: The Supreme Court ruled 5-4, a 5-4 decision. The word to is not needed, except in quotations: “The court ruled 5 to 4.”

DATES, YEARS AND DECADES: Feb. 8, 2007, Class of ’66, the 1950s. For the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, 9/11 is acceptable in all references. (Note comma to set off the year when the phrase refers to a month, date and year.)

MILLIONS, BILLIONS, TRILLIONS: Use a figure-word combination. 1 million people; $2 billion, NOT one million/two billion. (Also note no hyphen linking numerals and the word millionbillion or trillion.)See millions, billions, trillionsdollars.MONETARY UNITS: 5 cents, $5 bill, 8 euros, 4 pounds.

SCHOOL GRADES: Use figures for grades 10 and above: 10th grade. Spell out for first through ninth grades: fourth grade, fifth grader.

SEQUENTIAL DESIGNATIONS: Page 1, Page 20A. They were out of sizes 4 and 5; magnitude 6 earthquake; Rooms 3 and 4; Chapter 2; line 1 but first line; Act 3, Scene 4, but third act, fourth scene; Game 1, but best of seven.See act numberschaptersearthquakesline numberspage numbersscene numbers.

POLITICAL DISTRICTSWard 9, 9th Precinct, 3rd Congressional District.See congressional districtspolitical divisions.–

Recipes2 tablespoons of sugar to 1 cup of milk.See recipes.SPEEDS: 7 mph, winds of 5 to 10 mph, winds of 7 to 9 knots.

(Read More)

How We Write

Videographer at the U.S. open with a live camera shooting the audience.

When you sit down to write make, sure that each sentence reflects what you mean. Use active verbs and write clear concise sentences that convey your ideas.

Active Voice

The subject comes first in an active sentence.

Examples

Senate Republicans proposed a substantially scaled-back stimulus plan.

The city’s police chief and several of his department’s highest ranking officials resigned or were demoted on Tuesday in the aftermath of the death of Daniel Prude.

The pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca halted large late-stage global trials of its coronavirus vaccine because of a serious suspected adverse reaction in a participant.

Murals thanking frontline workers  popped up in neighborhoods all over New York during the pandemic.

Always look for an active verb to give your writing more energy.

Example:Avoid the passive “to be” verbs: be, am, is, are, was, were, being, been.

Passive Voice

Murals thanking frontline workers were put up in neighborhoods all over New York during the pandemic.

You can use the passive verbs be, am, is, are, was, were, being, been when the subject of the action becomes the object.

Example:

Many Washington Heights residents are forced to move to other neighborhoods because landlords found tenants willing to pay higher rents.

We use the “to be” verbs to describe a state of being.

Example:

Dayan is a junior in college.

Have

We use variations of the word have when we use it, like must, can or have.

Jorge has to reapply for DACA by October 5, 2017.

We might also use a passive verb when we talk about ongoing action.

Example

The student was reading a textbook when the alarm bell sounded and everyone had to leave the classroom.

Pretentious Language 

Sure, you may think it sounds better to use flowery language and fussy words. But you end up sounding pretentious.

Example

When the scions of the elderly gentleman thought he had a female paramour, they pondered about their fortunes if he were to suddenly become deceased.

Use language that says what you mean.

Example

The children of the older man thought he had a girlfriend and worried about their inheritance if he died suddenly.

Catch phrases, Cliches and Euphemism

You may think you can make a sentence sound important if you use phrases or words that only suggest what you mean. But fussy sentences confuse readers, listeners and viewers.

Fussy                                                  Clear

economically deprived                  poor

youths                                               teenagers, young men, young women, young people,

chemical dependency                  drug addiction

downsize                                          lay off

adult entertainment                      pornography

inner city                                          give the name of the neighborhood

You also want to avoid fussy words that connect ideas

however

furthermore

nevermore

nevertheless

Avoid the Negative

Write sentences that avoid the negative.

Example

President Trump not only picked a fight with NFL players who choose to protest, he ignored the hurricane victims in Puerto Rico.

Better

President Trump picked a fight with NFL players who chose to protest and ignored Puerto Rico’s hurricane victims.

Writing Numbers

Write out numbers one through nine.

Write number 10 and up as you would in math.

Writing Percentages

Write percent rather than %.

Full Names and Acronyms

When you write for print, TV or radio, you separate the full name of an organization and its acronym with the word or, or commas.

Example

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACCA.

When you write for the web you put the acronym in parentheses.

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Truth Detectives

Wayne Barrett an investigative reporter for the Village voice wrote:

“My credo has always been that the only reason readers come back to you again and again over decades is because of what you unearth for them, and that the joy of our profession is discovery, not dissertation.

There is also no other job where you get paid to tell the truth. Other professionals do sometimes tell the truth, but it’s ancillary to what they do, not the purpose of their job. I was asked years ago to address the elementary school that my son attended and tell them what a reporter did and I went to the auditorium in a trench coat with the collar up and a notebook in a my pocket, baring it to announce that “we are detectives for the people.”

Types of News Stories

People on the grass in Washington Square Park in early spring

Hard News- Breaking News

It is has happened, or is happening now.

The teen and victim John Vallejo, 32, shot each other in a confrontation inside First Choice Automotive on Randall Ave. near Bryant Ave. in Hunts Point, according to cops.

The teen had come into the shop with friends looking to pick up a black Mercedes E300 which had been in a crash. He was mad his repaired car hadn’t been washed yet and angry he had to pay a $1,000 deductible, according to shop manager Armando Lio.

“We told him, ‘Listen, we’re gonna wash your car so you can take it,’” Lio said. “And I guess he was on drugs or something…His eyes — it was like he had a demon in him. He was like, ‘Yo, I want my car right now.’”

Read More

https://www.cnn.com/videos/world/2021/08/25/afghanistan-taliban-kabul-mayor-mohammad-daoud-sot-giokos-ctw-vpx.cnnhttps://www.cnn.com/videos/world/2021/08/25/afghanistan-taliban-kabul-mayor-mohammad-daoud-sot-giokos-ctw-vpx.cnn

Feature Stories

By Elisabetta PovoledoAug. 23, 2021

BOLOGNA, Italy — The last time Martin Adler saw the three Naldi siblings in person, it was during World War II in the central Italian village of Cassano di Monterenzio, some 40 kilometers south of Bologna, during an Allied offensive.

Searching door-to-door for German soldiers in October, 1944, Mr. Adler, then a 20-year-old American private, and another soldier stumbled upon a large wicker container covered with a cloth in one house and were about to open fire after seeing it suddenly move.

Mr. Adler hesitated and a woman burst into the room screaming: “bambini, bambini” — “children, children” — and two girls and a boy popped out of what turned out to be a cradle. The two American soldiers lowered their rifles and laughed in relief. A photograph of Mr. Alder with the children immortalized the encounter.

On Monday, Mr. Adler, now 97, and the three Naldi “bambini” — Bruno, 83, Mafalda, 82, and Giuliana, 80 — met in person for the first time in 77 years at the Bologna airport, amid a boisterous scrum of local, national and

Read more.

From the New York Daily News

 

A copy of the 1938 “Action Comics #1” brought in $3.25 million in a private sale, according to a Tuesday announcement from online auction and consignment company ComicConnect.com.

The record-setting price, narrowly bested the previous record for the comic, sold in the auction of another copy in 2014 for slightly over $3.2 million, the Associated Press reported.

New York City-based company’s chief operating officer Vincent Zurzolo said the comic book that introduced Superman to the world is considered “is the beginning of the superhero genre.”

Read more.

Profile, A Look at a Person

Ian Austen

By Ian AustenFeb. 5, 2021

OTTAWA — For Murray Sinclair, being a bridge between Indigenous people and the rest of Canada has sometimes been a struggle. After he graduated from law school in 1979, a step that felt like “joining the dark side,” he was frustrated by courts where he heard racist comments flow and saw the justice system work repeatedly against Indigenous people.

“This is killing me, literally, to do this,” Mr. Sinclair, who is Anishinaabe, recalled telling his wife, Katherine Morrisseau-Sinclair. “I’m not really helping anybody, but I’m also being seen as one of them.”

Ms. Morrisseau-Sinclair persuaded him to visit Angus Merrick, an elder from the Long Plain Indian band and an Aboriginal court worker.

The two men met in Mr. Merrick’s tepee, the elder smoking cigarettes and both of them drinking pots of tea until 6 in the evening, at which point Mr. Merrick became direct.

Read more.

From The New York Times

The veteran Korean star Yuh-Jung Youn has had a thriving career for five decades — all because of a choice she made when she failed her college entrance exam.

By Carlos AguilarPublished April 2, 2021Updated April 7, 2021, 4:39 p.m. ET

For her 60th birthday, the veteran Korean star Yuh-Jung Youn made herself a promise. She would collaborate only with those she trusts. Even if their ventures fell short, as long as she personally appreciated the people making them, the result wouldn’t much concern her.

That late-life philosophy, born of decades of limited choices and professional trauma, brought her to “Minari,” the director Lee Isaac Chung’s semi-autobiographical story about a Korean family putting down roots in Arkansas. Youn’s bittersweet performance as the grandmother, Soonja, in the tenderhearted immigrant drama has earned her an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actress, the first for a Korean actress.

“Me, a 73-year-old Asian woman could have never even dreamed about being nominated for an Oscar,” Youn said via video call from her home in Seoul. “‘Minari’ brought me a lot of gifts.”

As she recounted this triumph and the many pitfalls that preceded it, her pensive expression often broke into an affable smile, cheerful laughter even. Dressed in a demure black top and long necklace, there was an effortless grace to her serene presence. She came off unhurried and welcoming but determined to make her ideas understood. Occasionally she asked a friend off-camera for help with certain English words to hit each point more precisely.

Opinion vs. News

Photographers waiting in the rotunda of the Russell Building in the United States Capitol, Washington, DC. Photo by ConsumerMojo.com

What’s the difference between an opinion piece and a news story? 

Daily News Opinion pageAn opinion piece gives you information from the point of view of the writer, or presenter. It may include facts, and reporting, but it differs from a news story in that it lays out an individual’s ideas and often their biases.  Opinion is, essentially, someone’s argument for a certain point of view about a specific topic.

When we read newspaper editorial pages, we see two types of opinion. We get the collective opinion of the editors and we also read, on the OpEd page — the page opposite the editorials — what individual columnists have to say in their byline pieces.

Charles Blow opinion piece

 

Adams & Hochul on gunsA news story reports the facts without the opinion of the reporter, writer, producer or presenter. It can contain attributed or quoted opinions of people interviewed. So a news story can contain opinion and tell a compelling story. But it should not include the opinion of the newsgatherer or the news organization.

A Pew Research Center poll, in 2018, found that younger people were better than older people at figuring out what’s factual and what’s opinion.

Pew said, “About a third of 18- to 49-year-olds (32 percent) correctly identified all five of the factual statements as factual, compared with two-in-ten among those ages 50 and older. A similar pattern emerges for the opinion statements. Among 18- to 49-year-olds, 44 percent correctly identified all five opinion statements as opinions, compared with 26 percent among those ages 50 and older.”

Pew Research Poll Opinion vs. Fact.png

You can take the quiz and see how you do.

https://www.pewresearch.org/quiz/news-statements-quiz

You can take the quiz and see how you do.