Reporters Want Access To Border Facilities

Both Democratic and Republican lawmakers have called on President Joe Biden’s administration to allow journalists into facilities housing unaccompanied migrant children who have sought asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border. The Biden administration has tried for weeks to keep the public from seeing images of immigrant children in U.S. custody. SPJ urged the Department of Homeland Security to reverse its position on blocking media access to border facilities Tuesday. “[Biden] promised both a more humane approach to immigration and more transparency than his predecessor. His administration’s refusal to let journalists fully observe and assess the growing humanitarian crisis at the border involving unaccompanied migrant children shows he is failing on both promises,” SPJ National President Matthew T. Hall said. Hall’s statement appeared in CNN’s Reliable Sources newsletterTuesday night, in addition to an article from The Hill.

Shootings of Asians in Georgia Massage Parlors

CHICAGO (AP) — The shootings at three Georgia massage parlors and spas that left eight people dead, six of them women of Asian descent, come on the heels of a recent wave of attacks against Asian Americans since the coronavirus entered the United States.

As details emerge, many members of the Asian American community see the Georgia killings as a haunting reminder of harassment and assaults that have been occurring from coast to coast.

WHAT HAPPENED IN ATLANTA?

EXPLAINER: Why Georgia attack spurs fears in Asian Americans

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FILE – In this March 13, 2021, file photo, Chinese-Japanese American student Kara Chu, 18, holds a pair of heart balloons decorated by herself for the rally “Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power” to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence outside the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles. The shootings at three Georgia massage parlors and spas Tuesday, March 16, that left eight people dead, six of them women of Asian descent, come on the heels of a recent wave of attacks against Asian Americans since the coronavirus first entered the United States. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

CHICAGO (AP) — The shootings at three Georgia massage parlors and spas that left eight people dead, six of them women of Asian descent, come on the heels of a recent wave of attacks against Asian Americans since the coronavirus entered the United States.

As details emerge, many members of the Asian American community see the Georgia killings as a haunting reminder of harassment and assaults that have been occurring from coast to coast.

WHAT HAPPENED IN ATLANTA?

Five people were shot Tuesday at a massage parlor about 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Atlanta, four of whom died. Police found three women shot to death at Gold Spa in Atlanta, and another woman dead at Aromatherapy Spa across the street.

South Korea’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement Wednesday that its diplomats have confirmed that four of the victims who died were women of Korean descent.

A 21-year-old white man, Robert Aaron Long, suspected in the shooting has been taken into custody and charged with murder.

As many raised concerns that the shootings are the latest in a string of hate crimes against Asian Americans, police suggested the suspect may have had other motives.

Long told police the attack was not racially motivated. He claimed to have a “sex addiction,” and authorities said he apparently lashed out at what he saw as sources of temptation.

But those statements spurred outrage and widespread skepticism given the locations and that most of the victims were women of Asian descent.

HOW HAVE SOME ASIAN AMERICANS RESPONDED?

Asian American lawmakers have expressed heartbreak on social media and emphasized the need to support Asian American communities during this moment. The official Twitter account of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus wrote that its members are “horrified by the news … at a time when we’re already seeing a spike in anti-Asian violence.”

Many lawmakers acknowledged a heightened sense of fear among Asian Americans as a result of the increasing number of hate incidents.

Rep. Judy Chu of California reminded people of the effect of anti-Asian rhetoric.

“As we wait for more details to emerge, I ask everyone to remember that hurtful words and rhetoric have real life consequences,” she wrote on Twitter. “Please stand up, condemn this violence, and help us #StopAsianHate.”

HOW PREVALENT HAVE ASSAULTS AGAINST ASIAN AMERICANS BEEN?

Recent attacks, including the killing of an 84-year-old San Francisco man in February, have raised concerns about worsening hostilities toward Asian Americans. Nearly 3,800 incidents have been reported to Stop AAPI Hate, a California-based reporting center for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and its partner advocacy groups, since March 2020. Nationally, women reported more than double the number of hate incidents compared with men.

Police in several major cities saw a sharp uptick in Asian-targeted hate crimes between 2019 and 2020, according to data collected by the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino. New York City went from three incidents to 27, Los Angeles from seven to 15, and Denver had three incidents in 2020 — the first reported there in six years.

HOW FAR BACK DOES ANTI-ASIAN RACISM GO IN THE UNITED STATES?

Racism against Asian Americans has long been an ugly thread of U.S. history and was enshrined into law in the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which was designed to prevent Chinese American laborers from entering the U.S. as a result of widespread xenophobia.

Asian Americans have also long been used as medical scapegoats in the U.S. and falsely blamed for public health problems, including a smallpox outbreak in San Francisco in the 1870s. This racist association between Asian Americans and illness and uncleanliness has also affected views of Asian food and contributes to the “perpetual foreigner” trope that suggests Asian people are fundamentally outsiders.

This fueled suspicions of Japanese Americans during World War II, when many were sent to detention camps solely due to their ethnicity, as well as Islamophobia and prejudice toward Muslim and South Asian Americans following the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

In 1982, 100 years after the Chinese Exclusion Act, a 27-year-old Chinese American, Vincent Chin, died after being attacked in Detroit because of his race. At the time, a growing Japanese auto industry was leading to major job losses in the city’s auto sector. His killers, two autoworkers, mistook him for Japanese, using racial slurs as they beat him outside a club where he was celebrating his bachelor party. His death led to protests from Asian Americans nationwide.

WHAT ARE POLITICIANS DOING ABOUT THE RECENT UPTICK?

President Joe Biden signed an executive order in January condemning anti-Asian xenophobia in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The directive acknowledges the role rhetoric from politicians, including the use of derogatory names for the coronavirus, has played in the rise of anti-Asian sentiment and hate incidents targeting Asian Americans. Former President Donald Trump, for example, has repeatedly used racial terms to describe the virus, including during a Tuesday night interview with Fox News.

The rash of attacks in the past two months has renewed attention from politicians, including California Gov. Gavin Newsom, who signed legislation allocating $1.4 million to Stop AAPI Hate and the UCLA Asian American Studies Center for community resources and tracking of anti-Asian hate incidents.

Initiatives such as increased police presence, volunteer patrols and special crime hot lines have also been suggested by local officials and citizens, with big-name brands like the NBA’s Golden State Warriors and Apple, based in the Bay Area, promising to donate to the cause.

___

Tang reported from Phoenix. Fernando and Tang are members of the AP’s Race and Ethnicity team.

News or Opinion From Poynter

August 16, 2017

News organizations aren’t doing enough to help readers understand the difference between news, analysis and opinion. We at the Duke Reporters’ Lab reached that conclusion after conducting a new study that found only 40 percent of large news organizations provide labels about article types — and nearly all of those only label opinion columns.

The Duke Reporters’ Lab examined 49 publications — 25 local newspapers and 24 national news and opinion websites — to determine how many consistently use labels to indicate article types. A team of Reporters’ Lab students examined whether the publications label editorials, news analysis, columns and reviews.

In general, we found inconsistent terminology and a lack of labeling. Some organizations provide a mix of labels that conflate article types such as news and opinion with topic labels such as local, politics and sports. The result for readers is a jumbled labeling approach that fails to consistently distinguish different types of journalism.

The findings are significant because journalists and educators are focusing on article labels as one way to address the decline in trust of the news media. Labels help readers distinguish between news and opinion so they better understand different forms of journalism and can assess allegations of bias. Readers often come to articles from links in social media and don’t know if an article is published in a news or opinion section unless it is labeled.

“People do get confused, and it’s particularly challenging these days when we’re publishing on so many different platforms,” said Washington Post editor Marty Baron when he announced the Post’s labeling approach at a Knight Foundation conference in February. “Our stuff is going out on Facebook, Apple News, Snapchat, this or that. The context that (an article) had in the print newspaper is completely lost on those other platforms. It’s important that we take steps to make sure that people understand what it is, with some sort of label that makes sense.”

The Reporters’ Lab study found The Post has the most extensive system for indicating article types of the 20 organizations that use labels. The Post website uses four main labels — opinion, analysis, perspective and review — and when readers scroll their cursors over those labels, a box appears with a brief definition.

Of the 20 organizations that did label article types, 16 only used them for the opinion section. Those labels included editorial (used on 15 news sites), commentary (seven sites), column/columnist (six sites) and letters (seven sites). Ten of the organizations that used labels were local and six were national.

Our study also revealed how readers encounter a confusing mix of labels. For the study, the Lab examined labels of article type, not the section where it appeared. But we found an approach that harkened to the newsprint days: Many publications used labels to indicate whether stories were in the local news, entertainment or sports sections. That’s helpful, but readers also need to distinguish between a news story and an opinion column or news analysis.

For example, this article in the Star Tribune appears in the Variety section with a music label. That’s a good indicator of the topic, but it doesn’t tell readers what type of story it is. A review? A news story? A first-person essay by a staff member?

We also found topic labels sometimes veered toward too specific, such as #TrumpsAmerica in the Forbes opinions section or marijuana in the Denver Post’s news section, neither of which indicated the article type. The labels were sometimes funny, clever or obscure, but these organizations missed an opportunity to describe the type of content they were producing.

We also found lots of inconsistency. Although some organizations did a slightly better job labeling article types outside the opinion section, the labels still appeared somewhat arbitrarily across the sites, often showing up on a handful of articles in one category but not all of the articles.

Another inconsistency: Even The Post doesn’t label news articles. The absence of a label is supposed to indicate it is news. The Post approach assumes that readers understand that unlabeled content is always news. But our students found it confusing, and we believe The Post should examine whether readers are really able to identify a news story when it is not labeled as such.

The study also found that organizations that do use labels are not making them visible or clear enough to readers. Students commented that the labels were “pretty easy to miss or misinterpret,” “not immediately visible if you aren’t looking for it” or “very small.”

As for the organizations that did not label articles at all, we found a pretty even local-national split. Thirteen of them were local newspapers and 16 were national organizations.

Our study indicates that news organizations can make some easy fixes to provide better guidance to readers. They should:

  • Use consistent labeling on all articles to indicate analysis, opinion, reviews and news. Although The Post is a good model for a labeling system, the lack of labels on news stories could still confuse many readers.
  • Place the labels in a prominent place at the top of articles.
  • Conduct research with readers about the most effective labels and incorporate the lessons in their publications.

Rebecca Iannucci is the manager and editor in the Duke Reporters’ Lab. Student researchers Jamie Cohen, Julia Donheiser, Amanda Lewellyn, Lizzy Raben, Asa Royal, Hank Tucker and Sam Turken contributed to this report.

Support high-integrity, independent journalism that serves democracy. Make a gift to Poynter today. The Poynter Institute is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, and your gift helps us make good journalism better.

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Rebecca Iannucci is the project manager for the Duke Reporters’ Lab. A 2014 graduate of Elon University, she spent two years in Los Angeles as…

More by Rebecca Iannucci

The Nut Graf

How to write a nut graf, or nut graph

Tell readers what you’re going to tell ’em

If I came to your house and told you to grab your things and follow me, how far would you go? To the front door? The driveway? Would you hop in my car without further explanation?

How to write a nut graf
Put the kernel of your story into a nutshell. That’s your nut graph. Image by kaanates

Home » Ann Wylie’s blog of writing tips » Writing and editing » Story structure » Feature Structure » Feature Leads » How to write a nut graf, or nut graph

How to write a nut graf, or nut graph

Tell readers what you’re going to tell ’em

If I came to your house and told you to grab your things and follow me, how far would you go? To the front door? The driveway? Would you hop in my car without further explanation?

How to write a nut graf
Put the kernel of your story into a nutshell. That’s your nut graph. Image by kaanates

No matter how dazzling your scene-setting feature lead, at some point, readers want to know where we’re going with this story. And that’s the job of the nut paragraph, aka the nut graf. (This, by the way, is the nut graph for this story.)

The nut graph is the transition from the lead. In the nut graph, writers and editors:

  • Explain the lead and its connection to the rest of the story
  • Reveal your destination, or the essential theme of the story
  • Set up the supporting material to explain the rest of the story
  • Explain why the story is important to convince your readers to come along for the ride

You don’t need a nut graph in news stories, but they’re essential in feature-style stories.

Let’s pause and ponder that for a minute too.

Here are four ways to crack the nut graph:

1. Tell ’em what you’re going to tell ’em.

Remember the old writing guideline, “Tell ’em what you’re going to tell ’em; tell ’em; then tell ’em what you told ’em?”

The nut graph is where you tell ’em what you’re going to tell ’em.

The nut graph — aka the “billboard” or the “so-what graph” — is where you put the story into a nutshell. It explains why the story is timely and provides the kernel, or central theme, of your piece.

“Once you find that idea or thread, all the other anecdotes, illustrations, and quotes are pearls that hang on this thread,” says Thomas Boswell, a Washington Post sports columnist. “The thread may seem very humble, the pearls may seem very flashy, but it’s still the thread that makes the necklace.”

So the first step to writing a nut graph is to find that thread. In other words, you need to figure out your point, or story angle.

2. Summarize your story angle in one sentence.

Home » Ann Wylie’s blog of writing tips » Writing and editing » Story structure » Feature Structure » Feature Leads » How to write a nut graf, or nut graph

How to write a nut graf, or nut graph

Tell readers what you’re going to tell ’em

If I came to your house and told you to grab your things and follow me, how far would you go? To the front door? The driveway? Would you hop in my car without further explanation?

How to write a nut graf
Put the kernel of your story into a nutshell. That’s your nut graph. Image by kaanates

No matter how dazzling your scene-setting feature lead, at some point, readers want to know where we’re going with this story. And that’s the job of the nut paragraph, aka the nut graf. (This, by the way, is the nut graph for this story.)

The nut graph is the transition from the lead. In the nut graph, writers and editors:

  • Explain the lead and its connection to the rest of the story
  • Reveal your destination, or the essential theme of the story
  • Set up the supporting material to explain the rest of the story
  • Explain why the story is important to convince your readers to come along for the ride

You don’t need a nut graph in news stories, but they’re essential in feature-style stories.

Let’s pause and ponder that for a minute too.

Here are four ways to crack the nut graph:

1. Tell ’em what you’re going to tell ’em.

Remember the old writing guideline, “Tell ’em what you’re going to tell ’em; tell ’em; then tell ’em what you told ’em?”

The nut graph is where you tell ’em what you’re going to tell ’em.

The nut graph — aka the “billboard” or the “so-what graph” — is where you put the story into a nutshell. It explains why the story is timely and provides the kernel, or central theme, of your piece.

“Once you find that idea or thread, all the other anecdotes, illustrations, and quotes are pearls that hang on this thread,” says Thomas Boswell, a Washington Post sports columnist. “The thread may seem very humble, the pearls may seem very flashy, but it’s still the thread that makes the necklace.”

So the first step to writing a nut graph is to find that thread. In other words, you need to figure out your point, or story angle.

2. Summarize your story angle in one sentence.

One of my J-school professors used to say, “If you can’t write your story angle on the back of my business card, you don’t know what your story’s about yet.”

To figure out what your story is about, write a one-sentence walkaway. That’s the one sentence you want your reader to — you got it! — walk away with after reading your piece. Then craft that so tightly that it will fit on the back of a business card:

Your walkaway sentence should answer the readers’ two most burning questions:

  1. What’s your point?
  2. Why should I care?

Stuck? Try telling a friend who knows nothing about the story what it’s about. Then capture that summary for your nut graph.

NYT Harlem 911 Call Illustration of Story Logic

Selina McNeal called the police just before 2 a.m. on Wednesday because the superintendent of her apartment building was screaming obscenities and breaking glass in the hallway. She briefly opened her door and spotted him, completely naked, she said.

Minutes later, eight uniformed police officers arrived, pouring out of an elevator. As Ms. McNeal hid under the bed, she heard a struggle and officers yelling, “Shoot him! Shoot him!” Then came a series of shots. “Pop, pop, pop, pop,” she said.

In a matter of seconds, the police officers shot and killed the superintendent, who they said had pointed a gun at them. One officer grappled with the naked man before the shooting started and was shot in the chest during the struggle, the police said. His bulletproof vest stopped the slug.

On Thursday, the police said the man, identified as Victor Hernandez, 29, had fired the bullet that struck Officer Christopher Wintermute on the left side of his chest and lodged in his body armor. Mr. Hernandez’s killing was the fifth deadly shooting by the New York police in a month.

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Continue reading the main story

A review of surveillance footage recovered at the scene and body cameras worn by seven of the responding officers showed that Officer Wintermute was first to arrive at the building’s second floor, the police said.

There the officer encountered a naked Mr. Hernandez in “a shooting stance” at the end of the hallway, said Deputy Chief Kevin Maloney, who leads the Force Investigation Division.

As the two men grappled, Officer Wintermute yelled for backup. Three of his colleagues responded and fired 17 rounds at Mr. Hernandez, Chief Maloney said. Ten bullets hit him.

“I did not want him dead,” Ms. McNeal said, hours after she first called the police. “I just wanted to find out what was going on.”

Mr. Hernandez, a father of two and the son of a police officer, had become the building’s superintendent fairly recently, his family members and neighbors said. Ms. McNeal said that before she called 911, Mr. Hernandez had been yelling in the hall for about 20 minutes, making vulgar threats about a woman.

The police commissioner, James P. O’Neill, said on Wednesday that the officers arrived at about 1:50 a.m. and fanned out to search the second-floor hallway of the building, at 2785 Frederick Douglass Boulevard, and encountered a naked man with a gun. “A violent struggle immediately began and shots were fired,” the commissioner said.

Image

Victor Hernandez in a photo posted to Facebook.

Chief Maloney said Mr. Hernandez had been the subject of six domestic complaints in the past. He was last arrested in 2014. He has never been accused of any crime involving drugs, weapons or violence, officials and family members said.

Ms. McNeal said that when she briefly opened the door and saw Mr. Hernandez, she did not see a weapon in his hands. “I saw something that looked like a laptop or a tablet,” she said.

During the shooting, Ms. McNeal said, she was hiding under her bed in tears. After the shots rang out, she heard officers shout, “Watch the fire.” Shortly afterward, she said she heard them yelling at one another, “Where is the gun?”

After the confrontation ended, Ms. McNeal again opened the door and saw Mr. Hernandez lying on the floor face up. The police later told her that what she thought was a tablet was actually a firearm.

“I’m still crying,” Ms. McNeal said. “I close my eyes and it’s all I can see and hear.”

ImageThe vest that stopped a bullet during the confrontation in Harlem.
Credit…New York Police Department

Mr. Hernandez’s family members and neighbors remembered him as a dedicated father to a 6-year-old daughter and an older son, a caring relative and an ambitious man who worked hard.

His aunt, Ana Martinez, said Mr. Hernandez grew up in the Crotona Park East neighborhood of the Bronx. He had taken the police officer and firefighter exams and was studying at Bronx Community College, she said.

Mr. Hernandez’s ex-wife lived in the Throgs Neck neighborhood of the Bronx, Ms. Martinez said. The two had been fighting over custody of their children, and the domestic accusations stemmed from arguments between them, Ms. Martinez said.

The ex-wife, Jaimily Hernandez, declined to comment.

Mr. Hernandez’s mother, Maria, has spent 19 years as a New York police officer, most recently in the Bronx, and he wanted to follow in her footsteps, according to Ms. Martinez. Mr. Hernandez also had relatives who were law enforcement officers in Milwaukee, Florida and Puerto Rico.

Given that Mr. Hernandez came from a law-enforcement family, Ms. Martinez said, she doubted her nephew would have acted violently toward police officers, and she disputed the characterization of him as emotionally disturbed or violent.

“They’re depicting him like he was some kind of psycho or something and he was a menace to society, but he was a person,” Ms. Martinez said. “His mom was on the force for 19 years. She served that city for 19 years, and they murdered her son.”

In a tribute posted to Facebook, Mr. Hernandez’s younger sister, Melissa, said her brother had been her best friend and her protector, an industrious, creative and loving person.

 

Continue reading the main story

Mr. Hernandez “was always good at everything,” she wrote. He learned to play piano by ear, taught himself to make high-quality videos and had strong technical and mechanical skills.

“My brother could do so many things, and it was always clear to me that he was destined for greatness,” wrote Mr. Hernandez’s sister, who declined to comment further. “Unfortunately, he’ll never get to use any of his many skills.”

Hours before the shooting, Mr. Hernandez ate dinner at a cousin’s house, Ms. Martinez said. He had also picked up his mother from the airport, where she had returned from a vacation in the Dominican Republic.

Over text message, his mother, Maria Hernandez, said, “His only contact with the police before this was domestic with his wife.”

She declined to comment further, saying: “Just know Victor was a kind, gentle soul. And my entire world.”

In Harlem, neighbors said Mr. Hernandez seemed in public to be a quiet, calm person.

Pedro Ramos, 44, who lives on the seventh floor of the building, said he had befriended Mr. Hernandez.

“He was a sane, good guy,” Mr. Ramos said with a tone of disbelief. “This shocks me.”

Jerome Selassie, 55, who owns the corner store across the street from the site of the shooting, said he saw Mr. Hernandez often and never knew him to be violent.

“I saw him last night, at around midnight,” Mr. Selassie said. “He was running to his apartment because it was raining. He waved at me. That was the last time I saw him. He looked O.K. to me.”

Image

The police officer who was shot in the incident left Mount Sinai St. Luke’s hospital in a wheelchair on Wednesday.
Credit…James Keivom for The New York Times

Officer Wintermute, 32, has been on the police force for seven years, working most of that time on patrol in the 32nd Precinct in Harlem. His wife is also a police officer.

During the struggle with Mr. Hernandez, Officer Wintermute was punched several times in the face and took the impact of the bullet hitting his Kevlar vest, officials said. Mayor Bill de Blasio said he was in “good spirits” after the shooting, and he was released from Mount Sinai St. Luke’s hospital a few hours later. Fellow officers applauded him as he was taken in a wheelchair to a waiting police van.

The police have shot and killed five people since Sept. 29, when Officer Brian Mulkeen and a armed man he was trying to arrest were killed in a police fusillade in the Bronx. Four of the shootings occurred in the past eight days.

On Oct. 15, in two separate encounters, officers fatally shot two armed men, one in the Gowanus Houses in Brooklyn and one at the 225th Street subway station in the Bronx. Two days later, also in the Bronx, a police sergeant shot and killed a man during a traffic stop.

Officer Mulkeen was the second officer to be killed by “friendly fire” this year. In February, Detective Brian Simonsen was hit in the chest and killed as he and other officers were firing at a robber in a cellphone store in Queens. The robber turned out to have a fake gun.

 

Continue reading the main story

The police said Wednesday’s incident was the 47th time this year officers have discharged their weapons in confrontations with civilians. Ten of them have died.

“It’s high in the last couple of weeks, but it’s part of where we’ve been consistent in the last couple of years,” Chief Maloney said.

Ms. Martinez said Mr. Hernandez sometimes expressed fear for his mother’s safety because she was a police officer. But his family also feared for his.

“We always told them if the police stop you, you make sure you be respectful and give them whatever they want because you don’t want them to shoot you,” Ms. Martinez recalled. “It’s hard when you have minority children, especially boys, and you have to tell them that.”

Susan Beachy contributed research.

Correction: 

Because of an editing error, an earlier version of this article misspelled the given name of a resident who called the police. She is Selina McNeal, not Selena McNeal. It also misstated the age of a man who was killed. He was 29, not 27.

Daily News Story About Pressure on Cuomo

ALBANY — Dozens of Gov. Cuomo’s fellow Democrats are defecting in light of the latest allegations of sexual harassment levied against the governor and other swirling scandals.

More than 55 Democratic state legislators issued a joint statement Thursday calling on Cuomo to resign as Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie said he will host a meeting later in the day to assess “potential paths forward.”Advertisement

Mayor de Blasio called the latest claims against Cuomo “disgusting.”

“It’s deeply troubling, the specific allegation, the governor called an employee of his, someone who he had power over, called them to a private place and then sexually assaulted her is absolutely unacceptable,” he said Thursday morning. “It is disgusting to me and he can no longer serve as governor. It’s as simple as that.”

The lawmakers wrote that the governor “has lost the confidence of the public and the state legislature, rendering him ineffective in this time of most urgent need.

“It is time for Governor Cuomo to resign,” they added.

Pressure has mounted against the governor in recent weeks as his administration became embroiled in controversy related to nursing home COVID deaths, which has led to a federal probe, and six women came forward with allegations of sexual harassment and misconduct.

Calls increased on Wednesday following reports that an aide claims the governor groped her and reached under her blouse late last year.

The Albany Times Union reported that the woman became emotional and told a superior about the incident last week while watching Cuomo deny he ever touched anyone “inappropriately” during a televised press conference.

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo
New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo (Mike Groll)

Five other women, including four who worked for the governor throughout his career, have publicly accused Cuomo of misconduct or inappropriate behavior.

Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins, D-Yonkers, became the highest-ranking of the governor’s fellow Democrats to call on him to leave office over the weekend.

Cuomo has remained defiant, suggesting it would be “anti-democratic” for him to step down.

“There is no way I resign,” he said on Sunday.

Some Dems have refrained from saying the governor should step aside, instead urging patience as Attorney General Letitia James oversees an independent probe into the allegations against Cuomo.

Assemblywoman Patricia Fahy (D-Albany) was one of nearly two dozen Dem lawmakers who signed off on a letter released earlier this week that said calls for resignation were premature. Fahy issued a statement Thursday reversing her position and calling on the governor to step down in light of the most recent accusations.

Sen. Shelley Mayer (D-Yonkers) also said that “Wednesday’s allegation of groping was, frankly, for me, the last straw.”

Though he stopped just short of calling on Cuomo to resign, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said the allegations against the governor are “nauseating” during a Thursday interview on Joe Madison’s radio.

Schumer also said he has faith in James, saying the investigation will “turn over every stone” and not let “any outside or political interference stop her.”Shant ShahrigianNew York Daily NewsCONTACT 


Shant Shahrigian covers politics for the Daily News. He was previously an assistant city editor for the paper, and has also worked for outlets from the hyperlocal Riverdale Press to Germany’s international broadcaster, Deutsche Welle.Chris SommerfeldtCONTACT 


Chris Sommerfeldt is a reporter covering the Biden administration, Congress and a variety of other political institutions and issues through a New York lens. He started working for the Daily News in May 2015 as a city desk reporter.Denis SlatteryNew York Daily NewsCONTACT 


Denis Slattery covers New York State politics as the Daily News’ Albany bureau chief. He began working at The News in 2012, covering breaking news and national politics.

Internships 2021

Some employers use Handshake to list their internships. Check it out.

Others use LinkedIn and it’s worth checking that too.

Internships

 Updated March 2021

wabctv-internships@abc.com 

ABC News Nightline 

Good Morning America Internship

ABC Internships

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Time Warner, HBO, CNN, Warner Brothers Internships

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New York Times Internships

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NPR

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New York Post

New York Daily News

Democracy Now

News Stories to Read March 4, 2021

Brian X. Chen

By Brian X. Chen

  • March 3, 2021

Lisa Whitney, a dietitian in Reno, Nev., came across the deal of a lifetime about two years ago. A fitness studio was going out of business and selling its equipment. She scored an indoor exercise bike for $100.

Ms. Whitney soon made some additions to the bike. She propped her iPad on the handlebars. Then she experimented with online cycling classes streamed on YouTube and on the app for Peloton, a maker of internet-connected exercise devices that offers interactive fitness classes.

Ms. Whitney had no desire to upgrade to one of Peloton’s $1,900-plus luxury exercise bikes, which include a tablet to stream classes and sensors that track your speed and heart rate. So she further modified her bike to become a do-it-yourself Peloton, buying sensors and indoor cycling shoes.

The grand total: about $300, plus a $13 monthly subscription to Peloton’s app. Not cheap, but a significant discount to what she might have paid.

“I’m happy with my setup,” Ms. Whitney, 42, said. “I really don’t think upgrading would do much.”

The pandemic, which has forced many gyms to shut down, has driven hordes of people to splurge on luxury items like Peloton’s bikes and treadmills so they can work out at home. Capitalizing on this trend, Apple last year released Apple Fitness Plus, an instructional fitness app that is exclusively offered to people who own an Apple Watch, which requires an iPhone to work

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But all of that can be expensive. The minimum prices of an Apple Watch and iPhone add up to $600, and Apple Fitness Plus costs $10 a month. Then to stream classes on a big-screen TV instead of a phone while you exercise, you need a streaming device such as an Apple TV, which costs about $150. The full Peloton experience is even pricier.

With the economy in a funk, many of us are trying to tighten our spending while maintaining good health. So I experimented with how to minimize the costs of doing video-instructed workouts at home, talked to tinkerers and assessed the pros and cons.

Here’s what I learned.

Michael Paulson

By Michael Paulson

  • March 3, 2021

Plays, concerts and other performances can resume in New York starting next month — but with sharply reduced capacity limits — Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said Wednesday.

Mr. Cuomo, speaking at a news conference in Albany, said that arts, entertainment and events venues can reopen April 2 at 33 percent capacity, with a limit of 100 people indoors or 200 people outdoors, and a requirement that all attendees wear masks and be socially distanced. Those limits would be increased — to 150 people indoors or 500 people outdoors — if all attendees test negative before entering.

A handful of venues immediately said they would begin holding live performances, which, with a handful of exceptions, have not taken place in New York since Broadway shut down last March 12.

The producers Scott Rudin and Jane Rosenthal said they expected some of the earliest performances would take place with pop-up programs inside Broadway theaters, as well as with programming at nonprofit venues that have flexible spaces, including the Apollo Theater, the Park Avenue ArmorySt. Ann’s Warehousethe ShedHarlem StageLa MaMa and the National Black Theater.

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