New York Times Looking for Student Coronavirus Stories

via Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJNierenberg/status/1326897276569194498?s=20
Amelia Nierenberg
@AJNierenberg
https://amelianierenberg.com/College journalists: We always feature updates from local news in the @nytimes
 Coronavirus Schools Briefing. I want to regularly link to student journalism.So! If you write a story that I should read — now or whenever — please send it my way: amelia.nierenberg@nytimes.com. Thx!  

Journalism Minor Curriculum

JOURNALISM MINOR CURRICULUM
The minor in journalism consists of four required 3-credit courses and two electives for a total of 18 credits. Most students also participate in campus student media and intern at local news organizations.

REQUIRED

MCA 101: Introduction to Media Studies

MCA 233: Introduction to Journalism
MCA 333: Reporting and Writing

(Note, students can take either Radio or Television Journalism as the fourth required course. Or take both and apply one as an elective.

MCA 341: Radio Journalism  

MCA 343: Television Journalism 

ELECTIVES

Select two from the following list. 

MCA 105: Introduction to Media Production

MCA 365: Social Media Strategies

MCA 31013: Supervised Radio Station Study (by permission)

MCA 401: Ethics and Values in Communication

BLST 31136: Race & Media

English 230: Writing Workshop in Prose

English 342: Advanced Grammar

Soc 250: Theory of Mass Culture and Mass Communications

Art 24020 Photojournalism


Media Internship or Independent Study for Academic Credit (by permission of program director)

Spring 2021

Journalism Minor Courses

MCA 233 M    Introduction to Journalism – Linda Villarosa teaches    

                       Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:15 a.m. to 12:15

MCA 233 4PR Introduction to Journalism – Barbara Nevins Taylor teaches

                        Thursdays 2:00 p.m. to 4:45

MCA 333 2PR Reporting & Writing – Garry Pierre-Pierre teaches

                        Tuesdays 2:00 p.m. to 4:45

MCA 333 4PR  Reporting & Writing – Michele Chen teaches

                         Thursdays 2:00 p.m. to 4:45

MCA 343          TV/Video Reporting — Barbara Nevins Taylor teaches

                         Mondays 3:30 p.m. to 6:00                          

MCA 31139      Podcasting – Camille Peterson teaches

                         Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:00 a.m. to 11:40

MCA 31006      Race & Media – Linda Villarosa teaches

                         Tuesdays 2 p.m. to 4:45

Independent Study 3 credits to work on HarlemView.

Photo Assignment

Due: October 8, 2020

Shoot 16 photos with your mobile showcasing the elements of photography we covered in class: compositioncolorlayering and action.  Do the assignment as follows:

4 photos showing effective composition

4 photos showing a command of color (and lighting)

4 photos showing good use of layering (depth of field)

4 photos giving priority to action (catching the moment)

Download the photos from your phone to your computer and rename them color1, color2, color3, color4; composition1, composition2, etc… and be ready to show them in class next week.

Writing A News Conference Story

Think about the atmosphere, what you heard and how other people reacted.

What was the most important point made. Lead with that.

Make sure to give us the basics. You want to avoid giving us a list of items, but you want to cover all the bases and answer the questions:

Who

What

Where

When

Why

How

Make sure you spell names correctly and that you use titles. Titles are only capitalized when they precede the name of a person.

Here’s what the AP Stylebook says about titles:

titles  In general, confine capitalization to formal titles used directly before an individual’s name. The basic guidelines: LOWERCASE: Lowercase and spell out titles when they are not used with an [more…]
Chapter T ; Updated on Aug 27, 2018

capitalization  In general, avoid unnecessary capitals. Use a capital letter only if you can justify it by one of the principles listed here. Many words and phrases, including special cases, are listed [more…]
Chapter C ; Updated on May 21, 2002

titles  Capitalize or use lowercase according to guidelines in titles in Stylebook’s main section. Job descriptions, field positions and informal titles are lowercase: coach John Calipari; forward Alex [more…]
Chapter Sports Guidelines ; Created on Feb 03, 2015

legislative titles  FIRST-REFERENCE FORM: Use Rep., Reps., Sen. and Sens. as formal titles before one or more names. Spell out and lowercase representative and senator in other uses. Spell out other [more…]
Chapter L ; Updated on May 01, 2020

nobility  References to members of the nobility in nations that have a system of rank present special problems because nobles frequently are known by their titles rather than their given or family [more…]
Chapter N

religious titles  The first reference to a clergyman or clergywoman normally should include a capitalized title before the individual’s name. In many cases, the Rev. is the designation that applies [more…]
Chapter R

religious titles  The first reference to a clergyman or clergywoman normally should include a capitalized title before the individual’s name. In many cases, the Rev. is the designation that applies [more…]
Chapter Religion Guidelines

academic titles  Capitalize and spell out formal titles such as chancellor, chair, etc., when they precede a name. Lowercase elsewhere. Lowercase modifiers such as department in department Chair Jerome [more…]
Chapter A ; Updated on May 01, 2020

preacher  A job description, not a formal religious title. Do not capitalize. See titles and religious titles.
Chapter Religion Guidelines

military titles  Capitalize a military rank when used as a formal title before an individual’s name. See the lists that follow to determine whether the title should be spelled out or abbreviated in [more…]
Chapter M

minister  It is not a formal title in most religions, with exceptions such as the Nation of Islam, and is not capitalized. Where it is a formal title, it should be capitalized before the name: Minister [more…]
Chapter M ; Updated on May 29, 2002

minister  It is not a formal title in most religions, with exceptions such as the Nation of Islam, and is not capitalized. Where it is a formal title, it should be capitalized before the name: [more…]
Chapter Religion Guidelines ; Updated on May 29, 2002

fire department  See the governmental bodies entry for the basic rules on capitalization. See titles and military titles for guidelines on titles.
Chapter F

recipe titles  Recipe titles that appear in stories or regular text are not capitalized (unless the recipe title includes proper nouns). Recipe titles at the top of actual recipes are written in all [more…]
Chapter Food Guidelines ; Created on Jan 15, 2016

priest  A vocational description, not a formal title. Do not capitalize. See religious titles and the entries for the Roman Catholic Church and Episcopal Church in the Religion chapter.
Chapter P

priest  A vocational description, not a formal title. Do not capitalize. See religious titles and the entries for the Roman Catholic Church and Episcopal Church.
Chapter Religion Guidelines

editor  Capitalize editor before a name only when it is an official corporate or organizational title. Do not capitalize as a job description. See titles.
Chapter E

composition titles  Apply these guidelines to the titles of books, movies, plays, poems, albums, songs, operas, radio and television programs, lectures, speeches, and works of art: — Capitalize all [more…]
Chapter C ; Updated on Feb 02, 2018

Roman Catholic Church  The church teaches that its bishops have been established as the successors of the apostles through generations of ceremonies in which authority was passed down by a laying-on of [more…]
Chapter Religion Guidelines ; Updated on May 01, 2002

shah  Capitalize when used as a title before a name: Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi of Iran. The Shah of Iran commonly is known only by this title, which is, in effect, an alternate name. Capitalize Shah of [more…]
Chapter S Load More

Assignment September 10, 2020

Coronavirus and Your Community

Assignment due Tuesday, September 15 at 5 p.m.

Write 300 to 500 words about the way coronavirus affects your community. Interview at least two people. Please try to interview people outside of your own family.

Use the active voice.

The subject does the action. 

  1. Write in a Word document or put it in the Google Drive folder.
  2. The copy goes flush left.
  3. If you include a photo put it at the top of the piece.
  4. Remember that this is a news story and not a term paper.  

a. You want to write a lead, or lede.

  1. You can choose to write in the traditional inverted pyramid style. That means you give us the most important facts first. https://ccnyintroductiontojournalism.com/2020/09/03/reporting-basics-2/

 

 2. Or you can choose the pyramid style where you begin with a small detail, or quote.

If you need examples of these, look on our website under Stories To Read: https://ccnyintroductiontojournalism.com/category/news/

If it is still confusing, get in touch with me.

b.  After the lede, you write the nut graf. Tell us what the story is about.

c. Then continue to tell the story.

d. Remember that one idea should logically lead to the next.

e. When you finish what you have to say don’t try to wrap it up neatly. Just finish. You can finish with a quote. But don’t tell us what you have told us. You can move the story forward. So if you are doing a story about people unable to pay their rent, you might give information about where people can go to get help in a situation like that. 

 

 

 

Active Writing

New York City Hall and a news conference in front of the steps.

Barbara Nevins Taylor

ACTIVE WRITING

Active writing allows you to say what you mean in a clear concise way with colorful verbs that paint a picture.

In 1946, the writer George Orwell, author of Animal Farm and 1984,  complained about politicians and others who use fuzzy language to hide the truth.

George Orwell.png

“Political language — and with variations this is true of all political parties, from Conservatives to Anarchists — is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind. One cannot change this all in a moment, but one can at least change one’s own habits, and from time to time one can even, if one jeers loudly enough, send some worn-out and useless phrase — some jackboot, Achilles’ heel, hotbed, melting pot, acid test, veritable inferno, or other lump of verbal refuse — into the dustbin where it belongs,” Orwell wrote.

In his 1946 essay Politics and the English Language set out six rules for clear writing.  “Never use a metaphor, simile or other figure of speech that you are used to seeing in print; Never use a long word where a short one will do; If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out; Never use the passive where you can use the active; Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent; Break any of these rules sooner than say anything barbarous.” – George Orwell

Here’s a recent of example of what Orwell talked about.

“As a man of integrity, I will not sit idly by while outside entities attempt to destroy my character.”

“The mischaracterizations and the politicization of the actions that I took after being informed of Mr. Prude’s death is not base on facts, and is not what I stand for.

Former Rochester Police Chief La’Ron D. Singletary.

How do we write a clear, direct sentence?

We make sure the subject does the action.

What does that mean?

Put the subject before the verb and the object.

Active sentence: Subject-Verb-Object

The verb determines action

Former National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster defends President Trump’s discussion with Russian diplomats.

Not So Good

“At no time were any intelligence sources or methods discussed, and no military operations were disclosed that were not already known publicly.”

Good

National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster defended President Trump and denied he leaked classified information to the Russians.

Not So Good

Allegations that President Trump revealed classified information to the Russians were denied by National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster.

Passive Verbs Drag Down A Sentence

You create a passive verb when you make the subject the object of the action.

Passive Sentence

In the first inning, the three strikeouts were thrown by Mets pitcher Rick Porcello.

Active Sentence

Mets pitcher Rick Porcello threw three  strikeouts in the first inning.

Colorful verbs that tell a story and convey action create strong sentences.

Weak passive verbs make mushy sentences. You want to use action-filled verbs.

The verb to be does not convey action.

So we try avoid using: to be, am, is, are, was, were, being, been

EXAMPLES:

1.

Passive
The roads were destroyed by heavy rains.

Heavy rains were responsible for the destruction of the roads.

Active

Heavy rains destroyed the roads.

2.

Passive

The goalie crouched low, reached out his stick, and sent the rebound away from the mouth of the net.

Active

The goalie swept out his stick, and hooked the rebound away from the mouth of the net.

3.

Passive 

The three-pointer was shot  by the Toronto Raptor’s Fred VanVleet in the game against the Boston Celtics.

Active 

The Toronto Raptor’s Fred VanVleet shot the three-pointer in the game against the Boston Celtics.

4.

Passive

The legislation was sent to Congress by the president.

Active

The president sent the legislation to Congress.

or 

The president sent Congress the legislation.

5.

Passive

The earthquake in Puerto Rico caused victims to be airlifted by helicopter to the hospital.

Active

A helicopter airlifted victims of the earthquake in Puerto Rico and rushed them to the hospital.

or

A helicopter airlifted earthquake victims and rushed them to the hospital.

6.

Passive 

Carolina is responsible for monitoring and balancing the budgets for the journalists.

Carolina monitors and balances the budgets

or

Carolina monitors and balances budgets.

Use the passive voice when you want to emphasize the receiver of an action, not the actor.

Example:

Many Long Beach residents were forced to leave the beautiful beach area to escape the hurricane.

Use strong, colorful verbs

Example:

Violate instead of in violation

Resisted instead of was resistant

Avoid Passive Phrases Like These:

Have been

Had been passive

GERUNDS

A gerund acts like a verb and a noun. You form a gerund by adding –ing to the end of a verb:

Examples:

run, running
play, playing

A gerund describes action or a state of being.
Grammarians consider gerunds a lovely way to write.

But in ACTIVE writing a gerund can slow down a sentence.

Examples:

1.

The Mets are feeling like losers at this point in the season.

Better

The Mets feel like losers at this point in the season.

2.

Fans are wondering if the Jets will be losing games all season.

Better

Fans wonder if the Jets will lose games all season.

3.

Nets players are surprising their new coach with their driving ambition.

Better

Nets players surprised their new coach with their drive and ambition.

4.

We sat up all night reading.

Better

We read all night.

or

We sat up and read all  night.

6.

I like to go jeeping in the woods.

Better

I live to ride my jeep in the woods.

But gerunds can work when you talk about continuous action.

Example:

You might tell someone:

We jumped over puddles last night.

But if it continued to rain:

We spent the week jumping over puddles because of the constant rain.

CLUNKY WORDS AND PHRASES

 Some words and phrases make sentences fuzzy. 

Currently
Due to
Prior to
In an effort to
For the purpose of
In order to
Is of the opinion that
Due to the fact that
In the near future
At this point in time
During my time
Subsequent
Affinity For
Am Willing

The English-Zone.com created this excellent chart.

PRESENT PERFECT, PAST PERFECT and FUTURE PERFECT
Passive form:
have/has been + past participle
had been + past participle
Active: Present Perfect
I have mailed the gift.
Jack has mailed the gifts.
Passive: Present Perfect
The gift has been mailed by me.
The gifts have been mailed by Jack.
Active: Past Perfect
Steven Spielberg had directed the movie.
Penny Marshall had directed those movies.
Passive: Past Perfect
The movie had been directed by Steven Spielberg.
The movies had been directed by Penny Marshall.
Active: Future Perfect
John will have finished the project next month.
They will have finished the projects before then.
Passive: Future Perfect
The project will have been finished by next month.
The projects will have been finished before then.
FUTURE TENSES
Passive forms: will + be + past participle
is/are going to be + past participle
Active: Future with WILL
I will mail the gift.
Jack will mail the gifts.
Passive: Future with WILL
The gift will be mailed by me.
The gifts will be mailed by Jack.
Active: Future with GOING TO
I am going to make the cake.
Sue is going to make two cakes.
Passive: Future with GOING TO
The cake is going to be made by me.
Two cakes are going to be made by Sue.
PRESENT / FUTURE MODALS
The passive form follows this pattern:
modal + be + past participle
Active: WILL / WON’T (WILL NOT)
Sharon will invite Tom to the party.
Sharon won’t invite Jeff to the party.
(Sharon will not invite Jeff to the party.)
Passive: WILL / WON’T (WILL NOT)
Tom will be invited to the party by Sharon.
Jeff won’t be invited to the party by Sharon.
(Jeff will not be invited to the party by Sharon.)
Active: CAN / CAN’T (CAN NOT)
Mai can foretell the future.
Terry can’t foretell the future.
(Terry can not foretell the future.)
Passive: CAN / CAN’T (CAN NOT)
The future can be foretold by Mai.
The future can’t be foretold by Terry.
(The future can not be foretold by Terry.)
Active: MAY / MAY NOT
Her company may give Katya a new office.
The lazy students may not do the homework.
MIGHT / MIGHT NOT
Her company might give Katya a new office.
The lazy students might not do the homework.
Passive: MAY / MAY NOT
Katya may be given a new office by her company.
The homework may not be done by the lazy students.
MIGHT / MIGHT NOT
Katya might be given a new office by her company.
The homework might not be done by the lazy students.
Active: SHOULD / SHOULDN’T
Students should memorize English verbs.
Children shouldn’t smoke cigarettes.
Passive: SHOULD / SHOULDN’T
English verbs should be memorized  by students.
Cigarettes shouldn’t be smoked  by children.
Active: OUGHT TO
Students ought to learn English verbs.
(negative ought to is rarely used)
Passive: OUGHT TO
English verbs ought to be memorized by students.
Active: HAD BETTER / HAD BETTER NOT
Students had better practice English every day.
Children had better not drink whiskey.
Passive: HAD BETTER / HAD BETTER NOT
English had better be practiced every day by students.
Whiskey had better not be drunk by children.
Active: MUST / MUST NOT
Tourists must apply for a passport to travel abroad.
Customers must not use that door.
Passive: MUST / MUST NOT
A passport to travel abroad must be applied for.
That door must not be used by customers.
Active: HAS TO / HAVE TO
She has to practice English every day.
Sara and Miho have to wash the dishes every day.
DOESN’T HAVE TO/ DON’T HAVE TO
Maria doesn’t have to clean her bedroom every day.
The children don’t have to clean their bedrooms every day.
Passive: HAS TO / HAVE TO
English has to be practiced every day.
The dishes have to be washed by them every day.
DOESN’T HAVE TO/ DON’T HAVE TO
Her bedroom doesn’t have to be cleaned every day.
Their bedrooms don’t have to be cleaned every day.
Active: BE SUPPOSED TO
I am supposed to type the composition.
I am not supposed to copy the stories in the book.
Janet is supposed to clean the living room.
She isn’t supposed to eat candy and gum.
They are supposed to make dinner for the family.
They aren’t supposed to make dessert.
Passive: BE SUPPOSED TO
The composition is supposed to be typed by me.
The stories in the book are not supposed to be copied.
The living room is supposed to be cleaned by Janet.
Candy and gum aren’t supposed to be eaten by her.
Dinner for the family is supposed to be made by them.
Dessert isn’t supposed to be made by them.
PAST MODALS
The past passive form follows this pattern:
modal + have been + past participle
Active: SHOULD HAVE / SHOULDN’T HAVE
The students should have learned the verbs.
The children shouldn’t have broken the window.
Passive: SHOULD HAVE / SHOULDN’T HAVE
The verbs should have been learned by the students.
The window shouldn’t have been broken by the children.
Active: OUGHT TO
Students ought to have learned the verbs.
(negative ought to is rarely used)
Passive: OUGHT TO
The verbs ought to have been learned by the students.
Active: BE SUPPOSED TO (past time)
I was supposed to type the composition.
I wasn’t supposed to copy the story in the book.
Janet was supposed to clean the living room.
She wasn’t supposed to eat candy and gum.
Frank and Jane were supposed to make dinner.
They weren’t supposed to make dessert.
Passive: BE SUPPOSED TO (past time)
The composition was supposed to be typed  by me.
The story in the book wasn’t supposed to be copied.
The living room was supposed to be cleaned by Janet.
Candy and gum weren’t supposed to be eaten by her.
Dinner was supposed to be made by them.
Dessert wasn’t supposed to be made by them.
Active: MAY / MAY NOT
That firm may have offered Katya a new job.
The students may not have written the paper.
MIGHT / MIGHT NOT
That firm might have offered Katya a new job.
The students might not have written the paper.
Passive: MAY / MAY NOT
Katya may have been offered a new job by that firm.
The paper may not have been written by the students.
MIGHT / MIGHT NOT
Katya might have been offered a new job by that firm.
The paper might not have been written by the students.

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Stories We Like

Empty Supermarket Shelves, NYC

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/05/nyregion/coronavirus-flowers-bodies.html

 

 

https://thecity.nyc/2020/04/amazon-warehouse-packers-in-staten-island-jam-onto-mta-buses.html?utm_campaign=mailchimp&utm_source=daily&utm_medium=newsletter

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/25/nyregion/nyc-coronavirus-crisis.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/02/nyregion/coronavirus-nyc-fear.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/09/nyregion/coronavirus-leaf-blowers.html

The New York Times

Quarantine Diaries 

“The first week, I was kind of enthusiastic about it — we’re going to be a family and be a unit! But now we’re sort of trapped.”

Within this three-bedroom South Bronx apartment, a raucous soundtrack plays: children’s squabbles and TV shows and laughter and the wail of sirens that sail in from the fire station across the street.

Here Tanya Denise Fields, her six children and her partner, Mustaphai, (plus Pebbles the dog) have learned that chaos and tedium can coexist in the most extreme ways.

Since New York City shut down last month, the family members have been forced to fully intertwine their once disparate lives. Ms. Fields’ children all attend different schools but now find themselves jammed in the corners of their windowless living room or sprawled out on a bed.

Everyone is desperate for a moment of solitude. And everyone has nerves that everyone is getting on.

“Usually I only see them for a few hours a day, like, after school, but now they’re here all the time,” said Trist’ann, 15, of her family.

For Ms. Fields, 39, who runs the nonprofit Black Feminist Project and films cooking videos for social media, managing a household of eight under quarantine has been an absurd task.

Read More 

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qjd7wp/street-racers-are-tearing-up-empty-roads-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic

By Mack Lamoureux
Apr 23 2020, 11:04
.IT’S A GREAT TIME TO HAVE A FAST-AS-HELL CAR AND NO RESPECT FOR SPEED LIMITS.

In early April, under a dark California sky, Jeremy was rolling at a leisurely 40 mph (65 km/h) when his juiced-up BMW slowly came into line with an almost identical car.

The two drivers lined up mirror-to-mirror and Jeremy rolled down his window. He caught the opposing driver’s eye and gave a thumbs up and the two ripped down the asphalt. Jeremy’s car engine is naturally aspirated, whereas the other car has a turbo—so, obviously, they had to see which one was faster.

Because of COVID-19, the public highway had turned into their own private racetrack to settle their differences. The Beamers went head to head three times over a four-mile stretch, with Jeremy winning twice, pushing speeds up to 150 mph (240 km/h). They didn’t see another vehicle the entire time.

“It was quite literally empty,” Jeremy told VICE. “I couldn’t see a single light ahead of me or behind me.”

Jeremy [we’re not using his real name because he’s partaking in illegal activity] is just one of many gearheads taking to the pavement to see what their cars can do now that the coronavirus pandemic has cleared the streets and highways. Police worldwide are saying they’re seeing an inverse relationship between the amount of traffic on the road and how fast cars are going. Speeding, stunting, and street racing are on the rise.

Read More

 

 

 

 

Arun Venugopal ‘s story 

https://www.wnyc.org/story/one-mans-experience-morgue-overflow-shift

 

Finding a story that makes you smile.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/in-this-quarantine-art-challenge-creativity-begins-at-home

 

Recording Phone Calls

Young woman with red hair and smart phone.

We want to make sure that you take special precautions to stay safe when doing an interview. The best method now, not always, is using your phone. You can record with Voice Memos. But it may not be the best quality. You can also get an app that does a good job.

Rev Call Recorder is available for free in the App Store. It says it provides free and unlimited call recording.

TapeACall is a favorite in the podcast world. It offers a free trial for seven days. That might work for your next assignment. But they ask for a credit card and that turned me off.

THE LAW AND RECORDING PHONE CALLS

Federal and state wire-tapping laws govern how, or if, you can record a telephone call.

You could be prosecuted or sued if you don’t follow the rules. So it’s imperative to understand and abide by them.

Federal law requires one-party consent. That party could be you. But individual states have their own laws. New York and New Jersey require only one-party consent. Again, that could be you.

But twelve states including California and Florida require all parties to consent to the recording.

You can check the laws of all the states here.

The Ethics of Recording A Call

It is always important to be as transparent as possible. Before you hit the record button ask your interviewee if it is okay with them. You want to make sure they are comfortable with having their voice and words recorded. They generally say, “Yes,” and appreciate being asked. This is the ethical thing to do when you are dealing with a regular interview.

The rules, not the law, change when you are interviewing for a story that requires undercover work. News organizations have different rules for their reporters and you want to make sure that you follow them carefully.

Journalists have a responsibility to honor the trust of the public and the people they interview. Please take this seriously.

Assignment: Cover a social justice story.

Assignment:
Research a social justice story about any topic. It should be about a human being or people, perhaps in your community, having trouble with an eviction, immigration, money, domestic abuse, facing discrimination,  solving the challenges of global warming or any other topic. The story must include quotes from at least three people. The quotes should come from the people you focus on and an expert who might have more information or offer a solution.

 
Write a pitch for your story. Here’s how to do it: https://ccnyintroductiontojournalism.com/2019/11/14/how-to-write-a-pitch/
Deadline for the pitch:  Wednesday,
Deadline for the story:
The 400 to 500 word  first draft of your story is due Tuesday, December 1 at 5 p.m.